Classic Hits

LET’S ROCK ANNOUNCE 2023 LINE-UPS!

LET’S ROCK ANNOUNCE 2023 LINE-UPS!

SPONSORED POST A celebration of all things pop and 80s, Let’s Rock offers gloriously unpretentious non-stop fun, with legendary musicians performing hit after hit to a crowd of all ages… The post LET’S ROCK ANNOUNCE 2023 LINE-UPS! appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Madonna celebrates 30th anniversary of Erotica with release of infamous picture disc

Madonna celebrates 30th anniversary of Erotica with release of infamous picture disc

Madonna’s groundbreaking fifth studio album, Erotica, will celebrate its 30th anniversary on October 20, 2022. In 1992, the album debuted at the top of charts around the world and has… The post Madonna celebrates 30th anniversary of Erotica with release of infamous picture disc appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
The Producers – Phil Harding

The Producers – Phil Harding

From being Stock Aitken Waterman’s engineer at The Hit Factory in the 80s, producer Phil Harding then worked with East 17, 911 and Boyzone in the 90s. Classic Pop catches… The post The Producers – Phil Harding appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
The Bowie Years Vol. 4 is now on sale

The Bowie Years Vol. 4 is now on sale

The fourth and final volume of the newly refreshed Bowie Years is finally here. From Outsider To Blackstar explores the creative, experimental brilliance of the star’s later period and goes in-depth with the… The post The Bowie Years Vol. 4 is now on sale appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Imagination Featuring Leee John announce major boxset retrospective

Imagination Featuring Leee John announce major boxset retrospective

A new 17CD boxset celebrating the career of Imagination and their lead singer Leee John has been announced. Imagination Featuring Leee John “40 Years” is a career-encompassing retrospective of the… The post Imagination Featuring Leee John announce major boxset retrospective appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
New David Bowie boxset, Divine Symmetry, coming this November

New David Bowie boxset, Divine Symmetry, coming this November

Parlophone have announced a new 4CD, one Blu-ray boxset, titled David Bowie Divine Symmetry. It’s released on 25 November and can be pre-ordered here. The collection celebrates the 12 months… The post New David Bowie boxset, Divine Symmetry, coming this November appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Union Street: Vince Clarke’s side projects

Union Street: Vince Clarke’s side projects

It’s plain to see Vince Clarke is a born collaborator, for throughout his career he has sought to find like-minded souls with whom he can bring his visions to life.… The post Union Street: Vince Clarke’s side projects appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Erasure announce deluxe reissue of their self-titled seventh album

Erasure announce deluxe reissue of their self-titled seventh album

Erasure have announced a 2CD deluxe hardback book edition of their 1995 self-titled album on Mute/BMG on 18 November 2022. Originally released in October 1995, the band’s seventh album, Erasure,… The post Erasure announce deluxe reissue of their self-titled seventh album appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
The Producers – Ken Scott

The Producers – Ken Scott

Ken Scott cut his studio teeth with The Beatles, but it was his work with David Bowie that transformed him into an iconic record producer and resulted in four legendary… The post The Producers – Ken Scott appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
The Lowdown – ABC/Martin Fry

The Lowdown – ABC/Martin Fry

ABC and Martin Fry came out of the Steel City with a silky sound that seduced a generation of pop fans in the 80s. While Fry is now ABC’s last man standing, their legacy remains as suave as ever… By David Burke

If ever Martin Fry is immortalised at Madame Tussauds, his waxwork doppelgänger will surely be wearing that gold lamé suit. Until ABC’s frontman appeared in the outfit on Top Of The Pops, only Elvis Presley had previously dared to make such a bold fashion statement and get away with it.

But the group of mainly Sheffield natives (Fry actually hails from Stockport) had more going for them than mere sartorial elegance – pop excellence was more their thing.

Formed in 1980, from the band Vice Versa, ABC was the brainchild of synth duo Stephen Singleton and Mark White. Fry was asked to join (as a third synthesiser player) after interviewing them for a fanzine. The fair-haired new recruit would soon assume lead vocal duties.

ABC Martin Fry
Martin Fry of ABC

A debut single, Tears Are Not Enough, made the UK Top 20, but it wasn’t until 1982 when they broke the Top 10 three times with Poison Arrow, The Look Of Love and All Of My Heart, all culled from their classic debut album,
The Lexicon Of Love.

This represented the culmination of their commercial success, although there were occasional chart forays in the following years.

Among them was When Smokey Sings, lifted from the group’s fourth record Alphabet City, which peaked at No.11 in the UK and No.5 in the US in 1987. By this time, Fry and White were the only remaining original members. 

There was a flirtation with house music on 1989’s Up and techno on Abracadabra two years later, before White quit and ABC was put on hold for six years. When the band returned in 1997 with the Skyscraping album, Fry was the sole member.

Another lengthy break followed, during which the VH1 show Bands Reunited attempted to get the band’s classic line-up back together.

Despite a Singleton and White no show, Fry and drummer David Palmer went on to put together a new ABC LP, Traffic, in 2008.

ABC Martin Fry

 

In April 2009, Fry performed The Lexicon Of Love album live at the Royal Albert Hall, accompanied by the BBC Concert Orchestra.

Anne Dudley of Art Of Noise, who arranged and played keyboards on the original record, conducted the performance and she teamed up with group again for The Lexicon Of Love II in 2016. 

Of course, it’s pure hypothesis to suggest that had ABC capitalised on the Lexicon… formula in 1983, rather than release the aimless Beauty Stab, their narrative might have taken a different trajectory.

However, there is no questioning the significant impact the band made with that magnificent debut.

The must-have albums

THE LEXICON OF LOVE, 1982

ABC Martin FryThe masterstroke ABC pulled with their debut was enlisting Trevor Horn as producer. In 1979, he reached No.1 as part of The Buggles with Video Killed The Radio Star, and produced a slew of Dollar hits.

He broke the band’s sound down to single notes, then sampled and stitched them together, subsequently adding an orchestra arranged by Anne Dudley. 

Though not a concept album, the record features repeated themes in which the singer experiences heartache as he tries and fails to have a meaningful relationship.

A longform music video/film, Mantrap, featuring songs from the LP was released in 1983. 

The album became the soundtrack to many lives in the 80s, and continues to delight decades later. 

HOW TO BE A… ZILLIONAIRE!, 1985

ABC went all electro dance on their third album.

American drummer Keith LeBlanc provides some killer beats and Gary Moberley some tasteful programming on a set that is bright and brash, not unlike the cartoonish cover.

There are guest appearances soby jazz man Guy Barker on trumpet and soul woman PP Arnold on backing vocals (Ocean Blue, which again features strings arranged by Anne Dudley), and a crack team of engineers to ensure the whole thing hangs together, which it does.

While the four singles issued from the record – (How To Be A) Millionaire, Be Near Me, Vanity Kills and Ocean Blue – hardly troubled the UK chart, Be Near Me did provide the group with their first Top 10 US hit.

SKYSCRAPING, 1997

ABC Martin FryMartin Fry revived the ABC moniker in 1997, for what was essentially a solo project.

He drafted in Heaven 17’s Glenn Gregory and producer Keith Lowndes to share the writing credits on Skyscraping, a throwback to The Lexicon Of Love era, although it was less sonically ambitious. The songs are still some of the best since How To Be A… Zillionaire! 

Modestly grand and glittering, the tracks here are burnished by glam guitars, sensuous saxophones (courtesy of Phil ‘Snake’ Davies and Paul Rabiger), kinetic keyboards and some discerning studio gimmickry that gives the LP a contemporary sheen.

Check out the 2013 reissue, which has a bonus disc that collates some non-album material, including a radio edit of the single, Rolling Sevens.

THE LEXICON OF LOVE II, 2016

Martin Fry wrote around 40 songs for the sequel to The Lexicon Of Love, then whittled them down to a more manageable 11. The catalyst was a 2009 performance of ABC’s magnum opus at the Royal Albert Hall.

Fry worked with several writers on the project, among them Rob Fusari, Charlie Mole and Marcus Vere, and with Trevor Horn unavailable, Gary Stevenson assumed production duties with Fry.

All the things that made The Lexicon Of Love so memorable – the breathless romanticism, audacious vocals and big tunes – are present, but more subtly executed. 

While there’s nothing of the calibre of Poison Arrow or The Look Of Love, Viva Love and The Ship Of The Seasick Sailor still come close.

And the rest…

ALPHABET CITY, 1987

ABC Martin FryAfter being treated for Hodgkin disease, Martin Fry returned to the studio with fire in his belly and a production team including Chic’s Bernard Edwards.

He reverted to the soul influences that shaped The Lexicon Of Love, filtering them through a collection that displayed shrewd pop craft. 

The band’s fourth studio album Alphabet City, inspired by the eponymous section of Manhattan in New York City where Fry and Mark White had lived for a period, saw them back in the Top 10 for the first time since Lexicon... 

Anne Dudley’s sumptuous string arrangements adorn One Day and Bad Blood, while double bass player Danny Thompson joins an impressive cast of sessioners.

UP, 1989

By the time of their fifth album (and the first not to break the Top 40 on home soil), ABC had become a duo (Martin Fry and Mark White), and found themselves hip to the changing soundscape of the late 80s by embracing house music.

Up is, as the title suggests, high on optimism and energy, especially on One Better World, the peace, love and understanding anthem for the techno age, and The Real Thing, while Where Is The Heaven? is a veritable booty-shaker. North and Paper Thin saw the pair adopt a more chilled-out vibe.

Up was ABC’s last LP to be released through PolyGram. They moved to EMI for one more record before Mark White left.

TRAFFIC, 2008

Martin Fry reunited with drummer David Palmer and The Lexicon Of Love’s sound engineer Gary Langan, and Rod Stewart band regular Chuck Kentis as producer.

It’s a more than credible effort that compares favourably with ABC’s 80s heyday, full of familiar sweeping strings, big beats and lyrical idiosyncrasies (witness Sixteen Seconds To Choose’s barbed opening salvo: “You’re hanging around for your standing ovation/ Plugging your crap at the radio station”).

The soulful The Very First Time and Love Is Strong are affirmation that Fry had returned to the inspirational well that birthed his best work.

The essential singles

TEARS ARE NOT ENOUGH, 1981

An exercise in pallid funk it might be, but listen to this Steve Brown-produced debut single and you can just about discern the breadth of ABC’s aspirations to pull disparate influences together on to a widescreen soundtrack – aspirations that would be fully realised by Trevor Horn on The Lexicon Of Love.

Indeed, Horn re-recorded the track for the album, though it was Brown’s version that presented the group with their first hit, a No.19 placing in the UK. Across the Atlantic, it was issued as the B-side of Poison Arrow. 

POISON ARROW, 1982

Nothing about Tears Are Not Enough prepared the Great British public for the three minute-plus drama of Poison Arrow, arguably ABC’s crowning moment. 

Sure it’s kitsch – the disco bassline, the synthetic drums, Martin Fry’s anguished delivery and the dialogic exchange with backing singer Karen Clayton before the final refrain (“I thought you loved me, but it seems you don’t care/ I care enough to know, I can never love you”) – but it’s also damn near pop perfection.

It climbed to No.6 on the UK chart and gave the band their first US Billboard entry.

THE LOOK OF LOVE, 1982

Not to be confused with the sensual Burt Bacharach & Hal David composition performed by Dusty Springfield for the 1967 spoof James Bond movie Casino Royale, ABC’s The Look Of Love finds the protagonist engaged in some kind of existential autopsy after his lover has scarpered.

Martin Fry, talking to Uncut magazine, said: “It’s about the moment you get your teeth kicked in by somebody you love, fucking off. You feel like shit, but you have to search for some sort of meaning in your life.”

It was the band’s highest-charting hit in the UK, peaking at No.4.

ALL OF MY HEART, 1982

The fourth single lifted from The Lexicon Of Love owes much to Trevor Horn’s ingenuity (but then so does the entire album) and peaked at No.5.

Although Martin Fry described it as: “Very Bridge Over Troubled Water”, its arrangement is nowhere near as prosaic as the Paul Simon standard.

He recalled: “I thought All Of My Heart was rather weak at first, until Trevor added the dramatic pause at the end of the chorus, before the line: ‘All of my heart’. Then we added some timpani, while the fadeout was a chance for me to have an English pastoral moment.”

BE NEAR ME, 1985

The second single from ABC’s third album, How To Be A… Zillionaire! staggered to No.26 in the UK, but finally broke the band Stateside, where it made No.9 on the regular chart and top spot on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart.

It’s a heartbreaker, as Martin Fry, poor fella, croons: “All of my dreams came true last night, in tears,” before he implores the object of his rejection to come back to him.

It was the only single taken from the album to trouble the UK Top 40.

WHEN SMOKEY SINGS, 1987

ABC’s homage to the Motown great Smokey Robinson found itself alongside the soul singer’s One Heartbeat on the Billboard Hot 100 for a week in 1987.

“When Smokey sings, I hear violins/ When Smokey sings, I forget everything”, gushes Fry over a glorious melody in which Motor City is twinned with the Steel City.

He later met Robinson, who, it’s no surprise to learn, gave the song his seal of approval… “I’d grown up on Motown, Stax, Atlantic and R&B, so it was incredible to meet Smokey,” recalled Fry.

Only for the brave

BEAUTY STAB 1983

The so-called difficult second album certainly proved a difficult listen for those of us who swooned at the majesty of The Lexicon Of Love. Even Martin Fry, in a 2005 interview, admitted ABC should have released a sequel to that album rather than this guitar-heavy mess of ideas.

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Q+A – Lawrence

Q+A – Lawrence

With the documentary Lawrence Of Belgravia finally able to buy on Blu-ray, we present our 2018 interview with one of the music world’s true cult figures… By Douglas McPherson With… The post Q+A – Lawrence appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Mute Records’ Daniel Miller talks Vince Clarke

Mute Records’ Daniel Miller talks Vince Clarke

The story of Daniel Miller and Vince Clarke goes back 40 years. In this interview from 2020, the Mute Records founder candidly looks back over four decades with “A warm-hearted,… The post Mute Records’ Daniel Miller talks Vince Clarke appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Q+A – Owen Paul

Q+A – Owen Paul

My Favourite Waste Of Time Owen Paul

We talk to My Favourite Waste Of Time hitmaker Owen Paul about now being a TWO-hit wonder…

Owen Paul is best known for his 1986 single My Favourite Waste Of Time. He started his first band, Venigmas, in his mid-teens and later moved behind the scenes, producing the Japanese band Buck-Tick.

He went on to become a music consultant for both the Hard Rock Café and Planet Hollywood before opening the West End theatre Venue (now the Leicester Square Theatre), which launched the Boy George musical Taboo.

Was your elder brother Brian a big influence on your decision to make music?

Without a shadow of a doubt. I’d never thought about making music until I heard the very early version of Simple Minds rehearsing covers of The Damned and The Clash in our basement. It was that whole punk ethos where you didn’t need to be a virtuoso – it was about joining in and trying to make a good noise.

When Simple Minds got signed to a major label – which no one in our circle had ever done – my whole school suddenly became a hotbed for bands. John McElhone, from Altered Images and Texas, went to my school. So did some of the guys from Lloyd Cole And The Commotions.

The Simple Minds effect made music into a real job that you could do, so everyone tried harder.

How did you get into the music business?

I was in a band called Venigmas when I was 15 and 16. We would travel up and down the country playing pubs and clubs. By the end of the band, I was writing nearly all the songs and I wasn’t happy with the way the band were playing them.

I’d met the Radio One DJ Peter Powell while I was in the band and when I left them he became my manager. Janice Long was doing a thing called the Oxford Road Show on BBC2 that had an unsigned act slot every week. I got the slot on a Friday night and by the Monday I was signed to Sony.

Where did you find My Favourite Waste Of Time?

I released a song called Pleased To Meet You that received critical acclaim, but it had no sales to back it up. I released another single and we were going to do a third before Sony committed to an album.

On the night before the recording session I was too excited to sleep so, to distract myself, I watched an old VHS tape of a Bette Midler concert. She sang a bit of My Favourite Waste Of Time in a medley. I became obsessed with it, playing it over and over.

The next day I found out it was written by Marshall Crenshaw and had never been released as a single. I changed all my plans, recorded it and, I’m not kidding you, everyone in the room knew it was going to be a smash. But, weirdly, I also felt it was going to be a career-damaging move for me.

What made you think that?

I knew if it was a hit, my record label would want me to make ‘Favourite Waste Of Time Part 2, Part 3, Part 4’… and that’s what happened.

On every song thereafter they wanted me to soften the guitars, because they thought it was too rocky, or cut them down because they were too long and experimental. It became very difficult, because I wasn’t the pop pin-up guy I’d become. I had signed to the label as a rock act.

So you decided to walk away?

I thought ‘I’m going to have to lay low for a while’ to try to regain my thing and slowly bring out more rocky records, little by little. That sabbatical turned into 25 years plus.

You’re writing again now though…

I never stopped writing songs and recording them, I just wasn’t playing them for anyone. I wrote one called Amazing and everyone said it was a smash hit, but no one said: “That would be a smash hit for Owen Paul”.

I sent it to a few contacts and got a call saying that Robbie Williams was considering it for his next album. As it turned out, he didn’t record it, but because 2016 was My Favourite Waste Of Time’s 30th anniversary, we decided to make some dance mix versions to celebrate.

One of the guys we asked was Stonebridge who declined but was interested in mixing something brand new. He worked his magic with Amazing and before we knew it, the track was in the UK club charts.

So, after being a one-hit wonder for 30 years, I’m suddenly a two-hit wonder!

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Q+A – Howard Jones

Q+A – Howard Jones

In 2020, the synth-pop icon discussed his then-recent lockdown concert, the progress on his latest studio album and the reissue of underrated fourth long-player, Cross That Line… By Felix Rowe… The post Q+A – Howard Jones appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Natalie Imbruglia announces Left Of The Middle re-release and tour

Natalie Imbruglia announces Left Of The Middle re-release and tour

Natalie Imbruglia – Left Of The Middle re-release
Natalie Imbruglia – Left Of The Middle cover

Natalie Imbruglia is celebrating the 25th anniversary of her debut album Left Of The Middle with a special limited edition blue vinyl on November 18.

Imbruglia took the music world by storm with the release of her first single Torn which topped the charts in countries across the world (reaching No.1 in Australia and top 10 in the UK and the US) and went on to sell over 7 million copies worldwide.

This was followed by the hits, Big Mistake, which reached No.2 in the UK charts, Wishing I Was There and Smoke. The album was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album at the Grammys, and Natalie went on to win two Brit Awards for Best International Newcomer and Best International Female.

Following the success of her summer tour dates, including Mighty Hoopla festival, Pub in the Park and Carfest, Natalie Imbruglia will be embarking on her Left Of The Middle 25th Anniversary tour across the UK this October.

The tour will feature some of Natalie’s most iconic hits from Left Of The Middle, as well as songs from her Top 10 album Firebird, which reached the UK Top 10 upon release.

Natalie Imbruglia – Left Of The Middle re-release
Natalie Imbruglia – Left Of The Middle re-release

Left Of The Middle Anniversary Show Dates:

Oct 10 – Bristol SWX, Bristol (LOTM 25th Anniversary Show)

Oct 12 – O2 Shepherds Bush Empire, London (LOTM 25th Anniversary Show)

Oct 14 – De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill (LOTM 25th Anniversary Show)

Oct 16 – O2 Ritz, Manchester (LOTM 25th Anniversary Show)

Oct 17 – O2 Institute, Birmingham (LOTM 25th Anniversary Show) 

Oct 18 – SWG3 TV Studio, Glasgow (LOTM 25th Anniversary Show)

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Tony Hadley interview: “The 80s were pretty good, but there’s some fantastic music out there today”

Tony Hadley interview: “The 80s were pretty good, but there’s some fantastic music out there today”

In 2017, Tony Hadley left Spandau Ballet. Less than a year, he was back with a solo album, Talking To The Moon. That year, he talked us through that turbulent… The post Tony Hadley interview: “The 80s were pretty good, but there’s some fantastic music out there today” appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Gareth Jones interview: Electric Dreams

Gareth Jones interview: Electric Dreams

Music producer Gareth Jones has worked with some of the biggest names in synth-pop, including Erasure, Depeche Mode, Wire and John Foxx. In 2020, he talked us through his stellar… The post Gareth Jones interview: Electric Dreams appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading
Human League announce new Virgin Years boxset

Human League announce new Virgin Years boxset

Human League - The Virgin Years
Human League – The Virgin Years boxset

Between 1981 and 1990, The Human League released four studio albums and one extended EP on Virgin Records. Those albums and that extended play have been collected in a special limited edition coloured vinyl boxset, The Human League – The Virgin Years, that can be pre-ordered here.

The Human League ‘Mark Two’, as they have been described, arose from the ashes of the band’s first incarnation and became one of the most influential and commercially successful groups of the early 1980s. The Virgin Years boxset opens with the classic Dare, the album that launched the band to superstardom across the globe. 

In the spring of 1983, the group released the six-track EP Fascination, which brought together the singles (Keep Feeling) Fascination in its extended forms, Mirror Man, and B-sides You Remind Me Of Gold and Hard Times along with a new track I Love You Too Much. 

The group re-recorded the latter track for the Hysteria album, which appeared in May 1984. The LP contained three hit singles in The Lebanon, Life On Your Own and Louise.  

Two years later, the band would experiment even further by mostly recording the album Crash with the production team of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis. The gamble paid off, and it returned The Human League to the top of the US charts with Human.

After a break in 1988 for a multi-platinum selling greatest hits album, the group returned with Romantic? However, after a dozen years with the label, it was to be their last LP for Virgin. 

The Human League – The Virgin Years is released on 11 November.

DARE – BLUE VINYL

Side 1

The Things That Dreams Are Made Of

Open Your Heart

The Sound Of The Crowd

Darkness

Do Or Die

 

Side 2

Get Carter 

I Am The Law

Seconds

Love Actions (I Believe In Love)

Don’t You Want Me 

 

FASCINATION – GREEN VINYL

Side 1

(Keep Feeling) Fascination

Mirror Man

Hard Times

 

Side 2

I Love You Too Much

You Remind Me Of Gold

(Keep Feeling) Fascination (Improvisation)

 

HYSTERIA – YELLOW VINYL

Side 1

I’m Coming Back

I Love You Too Much

Rock Me Again And Again And Again And Again And Again And Again (Six Times)

Louise

The Lebanon

 

Side 2

Betrayed

The Sign

So Hurt

Life On Your Own

Don’t You Know I Want You

 

CRASH – RED VINYL 

Side 1

Money

Swang

Human

Jam

Are You Ever Coming Back?

 

Side 2 

I Need Your Loving

Party

Love On The Run

The Real Thing

Love Is All Matters

 

ROMANTIC – CLEAR VINYL

 

Side 1

Kiss The Future

A Doorway?

Heart Like A Wheel

Men Are Dreamers

Mister Moon And Mister Sun

 

Side 2

Soundtrack To Generation

Rebound

The Stars Are Going Out

Let’s Get Together Again

Get Is Right This Time

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New David Bowie documentary Moonage Daydream now on release

New David Bowie documentary Moonage Daydream now on release

David Bowie documentary

The David Bowie documentary film Moonage Daydream is now on general release.

The movie is directed by Brett Morgan (The Kid Stays in the Picture, Crossfire Hurricane, Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck) and uses previously unreleased footage from Bowie’s personal archives. 

It’s the first film to be officially authorised by the singer’s estate, and takes its title from the 1971 Bowie song of the same name.

According to the press release, the documentary “illuminates the life and genius of David Bowie, one of the most prolific and influential artists of our time. Told through sublime, kaleidoscopic, never-before-seen footage, performances and music, Brett Morgen’s feature-length experiential cinematic odyssey explores David Bowie’s creative, musical and spiritual journey. The film is guided by David Bowie’s own narration and is the first officially sanctioned film on the artist.”

The film has already been attracting rave reviews. The Guardian called it “a mind-blowing labour of love”, while The Daily Telegraph wrote that it was “a kaleidoscopic odyssey through David Bowie’s brilliance.”

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The phenomenon of Swedish pop

The phenomenon of Swedish pop

Following in the wake of ABBA, Swedish bands and artists have increasingly made their way to the international pop stage…  By Jonathan Wright It’s easy to define the moment that… The post The phenomenon of Swedish pop appeared first on Classic Pop Magazine. ... Continue Reading

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